Please don’t put your foot on our Bug House

crocus March 15

It’s nearly a year now since I began watching some solitary mason bees (probably Osmia bicornis) in the Leechwell Garden, the community garden in the heart of Totnes. I was entranced as I watched the mated females building their nests in the removable tubes and in the holes in the wooden block of the fine Bug House attached to one of the old walls. They taught me so much about the life of a solitary bee.

 

Bug House Oct 14
The Bug House in October 2014 showing the removable tubes above and the wooden block nests below.

The Leechwell Garden is a public space and the Bug House is meant to be educational so it is understood that there will be a certain level of attrition. Sometimes visitors disturb the removable tubes and a few have been knocked to the ground (the tubes that is!). Last summer about half of the filled tubes were taken which is a pity as the developing bees probably did not survive. Anyway, by the autumn of 2014 there were about 30 filled removable tubes still left and I began to wonder whether they would make it through the winter.

P5120001
The removable tubes with one of last year’s mason bees and a friend. A newly filled tube can also be seen with its fresh mud seal.

 

I thought long and hard about what to do and decided it would be better to store the tubes somewhere safer. They need to stay cool all winter so I put them in our shed which is not attached to the house. I carefully noted which was the front end of the tubes and stored them in a cardboard box with holes to allow air to circulate. I waited until October 15th last year to do this so that the bees had entered the pupal stage and would not be damaged by moving. The nests in the wooden block, of course, stayed with the Bug House in the Garden.

I can’t say I felt comfortable about doing this, it felt as though I was tampering with nature but I convinced myself it was for the best. The way things turned out, it was just as well I had put the tubes somewhere safe.

Around Christmas time, the Bug House was knocked off the wall, probably by someone using it as a step to scale the wall out of hours. It was put back, only to be knocked off again, this time early in February. With the help of Susan Taylor and of David Martin, who in fact did all the drilling and screwing, the Bug House was put up again but this time at a place I judged to be safer, higher up and away from potential scrambling routes in and out of the Garden. The Bug House has survived two falls showing it is quite tough, but I am concerned about the effect on the bees in the wooden blocks where several mud seals have been lost (see photos below); time will tell if the bees have survived.

Bug House Feb 15
Back on the wall again!

 

Tubes March 15
The removable tubes after the winter.

 

With the winter nearly over and warmer weather in prospect, it was time to put the removable tubes back in their rightful place. Although I don’t expect to see the bees hatch until April, all the advice is to get the tubes in place by early March so that they can acclimatise and warm up slowly with the weather. So, on March 6th I opened up the box and put most of the tubes back in the Bug House. I was careful to put them back in the correct orientation so that the males can make their way out first. I saved a small number to put in an experimental Bee Hotel that I’ll describe in another post.

Tubes March 15 2
The removable tubes back in the Bug House; the majority are filled, a few empty ones have been added.

 

Block Feb 15
The wooden block nests in February 2015 showing that several had lost their mud seals, probably as a result of the disturbance. Compare with the picture below from October 2014.

 

Block Oct 14
The wooden block nests in October 2014 showing the neat mud seals.

 

With the tubes safely back in the Bug House I began to look around for potential bee forage. At present there are a few flowers in the Leechwell Garden, a little rosemary, some crocuses and several clumps of pulmonaria and I have seen honeybees enjoying the rosemary on sunny days. Also in one of the adjacent car parks there are some grassy banks populated with dandelions and celandines. The dandelions are very popular with honeybees. Also one of our neighbours has a striking deep pink, ornamental plum (Prunus mume beni-chidori ) which is currently in flower and when the sun shines there is a gentle, sweet fragrance and the bees flock to it; I have seen honeybees and one bumblebee.

Honeybee on rosemary
Honeybee on rosemary

 

Honeybee on dandelion
Honeybee on dandelion

 

It still feels quite early in the year and the weather seems stuck in a cool phase, but there is some forage about and on a sunny day the bees know how to find it. By the time the Osmia hatch out, which should be mid April, there will be plenty more forage about to keep all the bees happy.

Honeybee on prunus 1
Honeybee on prunus

15 thoughts on “Please don’t put your foot on our Bug House”

  1. I love all your photos Phil. I am seeing plenty of small honey bees and the odd bumble bee, even though there is still little for them to forage on. I shall have to make more of an effort to identify them correctly this year!

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  2. Great photographs! Your vegetation seems to be at about the same stage as ours. I’m sure the tubes will be fine. I think the loss of the front cover is not very important at this time of year. I had problems last year with lizards knocking my tubes out of one of my nests so we have tried to knock them in very firmly this year. I am having fun watching my Osmia cornuta males patrolling the open holes waiting for the females to hatch out. Won’t be long for your O. bicornis – they are so pretty too. Amelia

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  3. The Bug House is so attractive compared to my bee blocks. I might have to get a little more creative…(not exactly my strong point), but can I ask what the purpose of the center section is, the part behind the clasped door?

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  4. Hi Philip, Thanks for your comments on the blog! .I was lucky because the bee was just at my feet when I was sitting on the bench. I was lucky in earlier years to find the males resting on pulmonaria leaves in late afternoon sun but they are tricky. I was surprised to see the females out so soon here but the strawberry pot does get lots of sun when we have sun!
    Just posted a few shots of a solitary bee aggregation by the reservoir. I can never really tell what these little bees are. Lassioglossum or Andrena ??

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