Short on colour, high on drama – the garden at the turn of the year

How quickly time passes! It’s already a year since I wrote my first post about the Leechwell Garden, the community garden in the heart of Totnes. Each month I’ve written about the plants and the wildlife and it’s been fascinating to watch the Garden change with the seasons.   I’ve learnt so much and also met some wonderful people both here in Totnes and in the blogosphere.  (here is a quick link to these articles)

sage
A sage bush on a rare sunny day

 

I visited the Garden several times at the end of December 2014 and at the beginning of January 2015. I was particularly interested to see how the present state of the Garden compared with what I saw a year ago. I found, just like last year, an overall look that was monochrome, especially on dull days. The trees were mostly bare skeletal branches and there were very few flowers at this low time of year.

rose hips
The shrivelled black rose hips

 

It wasn’t exactly the same, though. A year ago, I found more colour. Last year, yellow crab apples were still gracing their tree in late December. This year the fruit disappeared several weeks earlier, partly because of the attention of the birds. Last year I was taken by the mass of bright red rose hips on the pergola. This year these are almost uniformly black and shrivelled. Perhaps this is due to the mostly mild, mostly damp weather.

holly
Holly

 

olive tree
The olive tree

 

Looking around for more winter interest this year, I found a variegated holly with its leaves shining in the sunshine. The olive tree looked very healthy but I doubt we shall be seeing single estate Leechwell Garden Olive Oil anytime soon. A nearby sage bush also stood out. Near the water I found several mahonia with their frothy lemon yellow flowers and for a short time I watched a visiting insect which I think was a hoverfly.

Hoverfly on mahonia
Mahonia with insect

 

bug house
The bug house. The wooden block mason bee nests are visible towards the bottom of the picture

 

The Leechwell Garden is normally a quiet place but towards the end of December there was drama. The Bug House was found to be damaged and had to be removed for repair! Apparently, someone had tried to climb in to the Garden when the gate was locked. They probably steadied themselves by standing on the Bug House which gave way under their weight. But all is now fine; the Bug House has been mended and returned to its rightful place. Fortunately, the removable tubes containing mason bee nests had been put somewhere for safe keeping over the winter and the wooden block nests seem to be undamaged. The new bees should be flying in a few months.

What we don’t know, of course, is what happened to the intruder.

lungwort
Lungwort with buds

 

Early January does feel like a low time of year and some of this feeling may be due to expectations raised but ultimately unfulfilled by our over-commercialised Christmas. The Garden does not reflect these feelings and if you look around, there are hopeful signs of the new growing season everywhere. Several trees are now veiled in a haze of small catkins getting ready to spread their pollen when the wind and the time are right. The clumps of the bee-friendly plant lungwort may not look particularly attractive at this time of year but they are already showing several stems with large buds. There will be flowers in a few weeks. I even found a few yellow flowers on a clump of primroses.

primrose
Primroses

 

Some of the most striking signs of the new season can be seen on the crab apple tree. From a distance its smooth branches have seemingly been invaded by regular short spiky outgrowths. These will be transformed in a few month’s time by blossom and leaves. Close up, we can see the intricate but beautiful textures of these buds and their rich, reddish-brown colour.

crab apple buds
Buds on crab apple

 

Postscript:  I can’t keep up with Nature! I  wrote most of this post earlier in the week and should have hit the publish button then.  On a quick walk through the Garden this morning I saw several pink flowers on the lungwort and the first frogspawn in the watery area.

frogspawn
I did not have my camera with me on the 16th when I first saw the frogspawn. Here is a picture of the frogspawn taken on January 18th when there was much more compared with two days earlier.

 

15 thoughts on “Short on colour, high on drama – the garden at the turn of the year”

    1. Today is sunny but colder here.
      The frogspawn is early but last year it was seen elsewhere in Devon at about this time. Last year I saw it for the first time in the Leechwell Garden on the 25th. Philip

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      1. I went back two days later and found much more frogspawn, now in two watery areas of the Garden, I have put a photo at the end of the post. So it is worth looking in ponds even now.

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  1. Well, I thought we were having a mild winter too until seeing your cheerful photos of primroses already! The damp has also put paid to any remaining colour here… except green; there is moss growing everywhere!

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  2. Yes, I was also surprised by the primroses.
    Devon is generally quite wet and we have a moss problem in our own garden which doesn’t get much sunshine. The Leechwell Garden is quite sunny and I think this keeps the moss at bay.

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      1. Well, looking closer at the picture it seems that the abdomen has the wax producing glands that exude scales of wax and the rear legs look like they have pollen baskets, but then I’m not familiar enough with hoverfly or bee fly anatomy. Mmm who is that mystery insect…

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