Hedgehogs, hyssop and strewing meadowsweet – looking back at the Garden in August

 

Beech nuts
beech nuts

 

August failed to deliver the holiday heat we expected and the unseasonable cool made us more conscious of the approach of autumn. Looking around, there was palpable change, particularly in the look of the trees. Some showed tantalising hints of autumn tints but, for many trees, the season changed their appearance in a different way. The fresh, bright green leaves that had signalled the headlong rush of spring growth now lacked lustre. Also, from our kitchen window I could see a lime tree that seemed to have been painted with impressionist-daubs of pale yellow-green giving the tree a lighter look. A closer examination revealed that the tree was covered with seeds and pale ribbon-like bracts; these will eventually fall together and the bracts will act as sails to aid seed dispersal. Another tree, a beech, exhibited a mass of fuzzy brown nuts, as if afflicted by a plague of small hedgehogs. Soon, however, the leaves will fall, the seeds will have their chance and the trees will await another spring.

Lime bracts and seeds
lime seeds and bracts

 

Leechwell herb garden
the herb garden

Down in the Leechwell Garden, there was still plenty of interest, especially in the herb garden. Several clumps of hyssop were in full flower and their colour, one sky-blue, the other pretty in pink, caught my eye. In the sunshine these new faces also delighted the bees.

Hyssop and bumblebee
hyssop and bumblebee

 

 

Echinacea
echinacea

 

Globe thistle
globe thistle and bumblebee

Bright pink echinacea and steel-blue globe thistle continued to flower valiantly providing welcome food for insects. I love the symmetry of these two flowers, a tribute to nature’s hidden plans. A tall mullein with a few residual yellow flowers overbalanced under its own weight like a drunk at the bar.

 

Artichoke
artichoke

Nearby, I found the massive flower heads of an artichoke topped with their punkish purple fuzz. The oversize blooms look like monster Scottish thistles and indeed artichokes are members of the thistle family cultivated for their edible buds. There is something primeval about the flower heads; fortunately the plants cannot move, otherwise we might have a prototype triffid. The blooms are also bee-favourites and I saw a red-tailed bumblebee seemingly drunk on the nectar.

 

water mint
water mint

The water flowing through the Garden from the Leechwell is very popular with visitors but it also attracts its own floral signature. Water mint, noticeable at this time of year for its many mauve flowers, dips its feet in the water and grows here prolifically. Richard Mabey in Flora Britannica tells the story of William Sole who, in 1798, wrote about the different kinds of mint and their particular smells. Sole likened the smell of water mint to “a ropy chimney in a wet summer where wood fires have been kept in winter”. This is too much for my nose and all I could detect was a strong minty smell.

 

meadowsweet
meadowsweet

The fragrant, frothy flowers and dark green foliage of the damp-loving meadowsweet were also in evidence growing near the stream. John Clare wrote about this plant in his poem, “Summer”:

The meadowsweet taunts high its showy wreath
And sweet the quaking grasses hide beneath

In the 16th century, meadowsweet was a popular strewing plant; its leaves were spread on floors to provide a crude carpet and a pleasant odour. The foliage of the plant emits a sharp aromatic scent and Gerard, in his herbal, extols the virtues of strewing meadowsweet: “the smell thereof makes the heart merrie, delighteth the senses”; it is said that meadowsweet was the favourite strewing plant of Elizabeth I. In contrast to the odour associated with the foliage, the creamy-white flowers have a different scent which, to me, is sickly sweet.

Meadowsweet has long been used in folk medicine to provide relief against mild pain. We now know that the plant contains chemicals similar to those in willow bark, another natural analgesic. These naturally occurring molecules were used to develop aspirin and the name of this widely consumed drug was derived from the old botanical name of meadowsweet, Spiraea ulmaria.

I wrote last month about the departure of the swifts. It turns out that this was slightly inaccurate as on the evening of August 10 two more appeared over the Garden; I suppose these swifts were on their way to the coast as we didn’t see them again. They were then replaced for a few days by a group of house martins. These are not as acrobatic or as quick as the swifts but it was good to see them swooping and twittering to one another as they harvested the insects.

The featured image at the top of this post shows a pollen-loaded honeybee on mullein.

This is the ninth of my diary entries for the Leechwell Garden;  to see the others please put “Leechwell” in the search box.

10 thoughts on “Hedgehogs, hyssop and strewing meadowsweet – looking back at the Garden in August”

  1. I’m just hearing about hyssop recently. It sounds like it blooms for a long time and the bees like it. If it grows in the UK, it ought to grow here because the Oregon Coast is somewhat similar in weather. Thanks for the photo of it.

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    1. I also only heard about it recently. It’s very attractive to look at and the bees do like it. It also seems to flower fairly late in the season so it fills in when some have finished, at least that’s what happened here.

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  2. Although we seem to be about three weeks ahead with autumn the swallows are only just leaving now. Just a few house martins are still here; we had flying ants for several days, which I have never seen before at this time of year and over a longer period, but the birds have been enjoying them!

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  3. Leechwell Garden has such a beautiful selection of plants and flowers throughout the different seasons. I keep my plant “Wish List” open as I read your blog. There are so many plants I would like to incorporate into my garden. I have had a new little pink thistle this year but the Globe Artichoke can also be used as an architectural plant in the garden like the Mullein. I think that is one of my problems, trying to fit all the plants I would like into suitable places for them in the garden! That is a lovely photograph your wife has taken of the flower growing so well on the stone. I often marvel at these plants growing in seemingly impossible places. Amelia

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  4. Thanks for your comment Amelia, the plants in the Leechwell Garden have been very well chosen by the clever people who designed it.

    I am pleased you liked the photo of the Rock Sea-Spurrey. We were also amazed by how it was managing to grow in next to no soil, but it seemed to be thriving.

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